What is Web Design?
Web design is the process of planning and creating a website. Text, images, digital media and interactive elements are shaped by the web designer to produce the page seen on the web browser. Web designers utilize markup language, most notably HTML for structure and CSS for presentation to develop pages that can be read by web browsers.

As a whole, the process of web design includes conceptualization, planning, post-production, research, advertising as well as media control that is applied to the pages within the site by the designer or group of designers with a specific purpose. The site itself can be divided into its main page, also known as the home page, which cites the main objective as well as highlights of the site''s daily updates; which also contains hyperlinks that functions to direct viewers to a designated page within the site''s domain.

Ideally, web designers should strive to write code that is valid HTML and CSS. In doing so it makes it easier to correct problems, edit pages, or update pages. Additionally, keeping your HTML files and CSS files separate helps to make it easier to make changes. For example, having a separate CSS file allows for aesthetic changes to be made to the entire site rather than to just a single page. If CSS rules are included within a single HTML page, changes would have to be made to each and every page. The reasoning is that HTML should only be used for raw content and CSS be used to manipulate the content for aesthetic style. This is true for scripting files as well.[citation needed]

Changes and updates
Initial website designs normally need small tweaks and changes after they go live, but major updates and re-designs may be undertaken periodically.

Changes to websites almost always provoke a backlash from its regular users. The reason for this is primarily that change is disruptive to the user: for example, the link that the user previously learned was always in the lower left corner is now "missing", and the user must search the page to discover its new location. The user is disoriented, frustrated, slowed down, and needs time to learn and adapt to the new arrangement. On websites with users who spend significant amounts of time each day using, like Facebook or Wikipedia, users normally respond to even moderate changes with noisy protests and empty threats to leave the website.

Within a few weeks or months, however, most users have adapted to the changes and no longer object to them. For example, the signature feature of Facebook, a news feed, drew millions of complaints when it first appeared, but users now say that it is an important and highly desirable feature.

Major websites may try to minimize this with phased rollouts of changes, testing the new design with a small number of randomly selected users, describing the importance of the upcoming changes in advance, and offering users the option of keeping the old design until they have acclimated to the new one. However, the primary cure for complaints is simply to wait